The Butterfly Plant

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The Butterfly Plant

The poisonous milkweed plant is the primary food source for the Monark Butterfly pupa, or caterpillar (which is classified as a specialist herbivore). Milkweeds are the only source of nourishment up until they are released from their cocoon (chrysalis) and transformed (or undergo metamorphosis) into a butterfly. After transformation the adults drink water and extract nectar from many kinds of flowers. Monarck Butterflies do pollinate flowers, but not nearly as proficiently as bees.

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The vast majority of all Monarchs in North America make their home in agricultural areas that are abundant with milkweed plants whose leaves provide a safe place to deposit their eggs, and also to feed their offspring. When returning every spring from their winter migration, the Monarch Butterflies will stop over at the re-surging milkweed plants and continue northward.

The Butterfly Plant

The overall butterfly plant family contains over two thousand varieties. North America is home to over 105 versions. The Monarchs lay their eggs on several varieties, but seem to prefer the native, instead of hybrid, varieties. Many kinds of milkweeds found in North America contain poisons and are toxic enough to harm livestock and other animals that have not learned through evolution to avoid them.

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The butterfly milkweeds that contain bad tasting and bitter heart poisoning ingredients (cardiac glycosides) are ingested by the Monarch larvae, and these toxins remain in their body after becoming an adult butterfly. Birds, and other predators, eating Monarchs containing these poisons, can become very ill, possibly fatally so. The Monarch Butterfly, and some other insects, have developed immunity to these poison juices. Interestingly the Viceroy Butterfly, although not containing toxins, has mimicked itself over time to look very similar to the Monarch, thereby deterring many predators.

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On the predator side, two species birds, the Black Back Oriole and the Black Headed Grosbeak are not affected by the milkweed plant toxins, and are the Monark Butterfly's main adversary.

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Varieties of butterfly milkweed are found abundantly, and although the United States government has not labeled the plant as poisonous or noxious, farmers consider the plant a weed and a real nuisance to their livestock and crops. Farmers often apply herbicides to large acreages to kill unwanted vegetation. This has resulted in a very sizeable decrease of the Monarch Butterfly’s source of the milkweed plant, especially throughout the mid-western agricultural areas, thereby affecting their summertime migratory behavior.

The Butterfly Plant

Scientists are now able to determine the migratory paths of Monark Butterflies. An adult can be analyzed to determine exactly which species of butterfly plant it fed upon earlier in its caterpillar state. As milkweed varieties are often confined to a particular locality, a Monark Butterfly found in eastern Virginia may have been born in western Arkansas!

The Butterfly Plant

The Butterfly Plant
The Butterfly Plant

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